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TP-LINK TL-ANT2415D 2.4GHz 15dBi Outdoor Omni-directional Antenna, N Female connector, weather resistant


TP-LINK TL-ANT2415D 2.4GHz 15dBi Outdoor Omni-directional Antenna, N Female connector, weather resistant


TP-LINK Outdoor Omni-directional Antenna (TL-ANT2415D)

  • Provides 15dBi signal gain
  • Provides N Female connector
  • Be applied to various weather conditions
  • Compatible with all the 802.11n/b/g products (2.4GHz)

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Question by Amos: i would like to extend wireless to 500m & was planning to go for the Airnet outdoor ap or how do i go abt it?
now where i don’t understand is wherever i need two of them one at the work where internet is and the other at home???????

Best answer:

Answer by Adrian
First, you need clear line of sight to go 500M. The antennas must be able to see each other, at least 90% of it…
That requires height in most cases, unless you are on flat terrain…
If you have line of sight, you are looking for a wireless bridge. Those act as though it were wired, but wireless instead. The best is “Transparent Wireless Bridge”, where the devices are not even on your own network, but on another private subnet (for admin purposes only – mine are at 192.168.200.1 and .2). Your devices at home then appear to be connected directly to the work network.

Work – Wireless bridge -> Antenna <-> 500M <-> Antenna -> Wireless Bridge – Home switch (no router needed)

There are other wireless bridges that run on 900Mhz (Ubiquity makes them), and do not require direct line of sight. However, they tend to be a bit slower, commonly in the 2-10mbps range instead of 2.4Ghz wireless bridges at 54mbps. The advantage, is that you do not need any towers and such to make the connection. The disadvantage is the slower speed, and usually larger antennas on the “roof”.

You so NOT want a simple AP and a Client (subscriber) unit unless those can be configured as bridges. While they may work for a single connection, they are not true bridges… If it is only one computer at home, then yes, an AP at work and the Client unit at home may work enough for you. Same rules apply about line of sight…

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

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What customers say about TP-LINK TL-ANT2415D 2.4GHz 15dBi Outdoor Omni-directional Antenna, N Female connector, weather resistant?

  1. 29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best Omnidirectional Antennas!, September 23, 2012
    By 
    JustMe (West Michigan, USA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: TP-LINK TL-ANT2415D 2.4GHz 15dBi Outdoor Omni-directional Antenna, N Female connector, weather resistant (Personal Computers)

    I am a tech geek. It’s important you know that.

    Where I live, literally across the street is a MAJOR summer concert venue for our town. While it’s great living downtown, it does mean that during major events Verizon’s vaunted 4G/LTE network drops to its knees. I mean it becomes “1X,” at best! And if you have a “smart phone,” it can mean just getting a Facebook update can take 45 minutes! I kid you not. And the only alternative to Verizon’s neutered network was to sit in the lobby of the apartment complex and use the landlord’s Access Point. Ugh.. *pulls hair*

    It was at this impasse I decided to experiment with TP-Link’s much-praised TL-WR1043ND wireless router. But I took it to the next level: I also ordered the three-meter “pigtail” cables and three 15dBi omnidirectional antennas (which I’m reviewing here).

    To make it brief, I was STUNNED. The pigtails have a 2.9dB “insertion loss.” I didn’t know what that meant when I ordered them (hey, we all gotta start somewhere), but it turns out I’m losing nearly HALF the transmit signal from the router in the coax before it even gets to the antenna! Again, this is NO FAULT of TP-Link: I was too ignorant at the time to understand what I was ordering. My boo-boo.

    Anyway, despite all of that; after re-flashing my WR1043ND with dd-wrt I wanted to see how far into the “concert venue” I could go with my Droid Razr Maxx and still connect to my “home wireless LAN” across the street. Turns out that, even with losing HALF the TX signal in the coax, using these antennas I could connect almost 1,000 feet away from the Access Point!! I was AMAZED.

    Anyway, to “cut to the chase,” with what I’ve learned my next step is as follows: First, I’m going to “hardware mod” my 1043 router, replacing the RP-SMA connectors with N-females. And I’m going to use either LMR-400 or LMR-600 (which will fit inside the router’s cabinet) to connect the N-female connectors with their respective soldier joints on the PC board. Next, I’m going to use LDF4-50A heliax cable to connect from the router to the antennas. Even with 20-feet of cable (as opposed to the nine-foot pigtails) my “insertion loss” will only be 0.8dB as opposed to 2.9dB. This means not only will most of my TX signal get out to the antennas, but most of the RX signal will make it from the antennas to the router. AND, with twenty feet of cable, I can separate the antennas at 15-foot increments (the most I can currently do) to maximize the MIMO (“Multiple Input, Multiple Output) design of the 1043 router.

    As it stands, right now, I am able to receive free Access Points that are one-half to one MILE away from where I live. For an omnidirectional, this antenna is AMAZING, and I cannot wait to report back what I can achieve once I have the LDF4-50A heliax and a 1043ND router customized to use N-female connectors.

    Stay tuned…

    P.S.: One more important thing for you to understand: Even though these are “omnidirectional,” they are NOT “isotropic” meaning they do NOT propagate the signal in a three-dimensional spherical pattern. Ergo, while the signal does radiate in a 360-degree pattern, that pattern is perpendicular to the antenna. This is called the “horizontal propagation.” The VERTICAL propagation is only 9 degrees, and which is why it achieves a 15dBi gain: Almost none of the signal is “wasted” going out above or below the antenna. You therefore have to keep this in mind when planning your layout so that the intended coverage area does indeed get covered.

    For example, let’s say you mount this antenna on the side of a building or on a pole twenty feet above the ground. Recalling your junior-high trigonometry, a nine-degree vertical propagation means the signal won’t hit the ground for a distance of about 126 feet from the antenna. Here’s the math: Distance = height * (1 / tan(9)).

    Lesson: If you want to use this antenna to extend your wireless coverage to your backyard, it will certainly do the job — but depending on the coverage area you may need to mount the antenna at an angle so that its horizontal propagation properly covers the area.

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  2. 6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Works great, October 27, 2011
    By 
    ITguy

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    Currently use this antenna to make long distance links. Currently use a pair of EOC2611P with only one dish. Distance is about 3 miles. With no antenna the units would bearly connect in b mode, kept dropping packets and lots of interferance. Added one and got over double the signal able to maintain a g connection and cut out lots of the interferance.

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  3. 8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    signal good, June 2, 2012
    By 
    djichs

    what can i say am running ddwrt on my wrt54g v2 running tx rate at 250mw cpu 263 mhz and i live in jamaica and i am far away from the libray that was my target about mile and half or more and i pick up the access point with no trouble this best antenna

    54 Mbps speed link
    77-dbi signal
    noise 83

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